Wales Coast Path – Caernarfon to Gyrn Goch

WCP Caernarfon17 February 2018 – 14.98 miles

February half-term so we had a few days in North Wales to join up part of the coast path from Caernarfon to the north of the Llŷn Peninsula, and then to carry on round the southern end. We stayed for the first couple of nights in the Black Boy in Caernarfon, busy, cosy and they fed us extremely well!

We walked down to the marina and across the footbridge, where we had finished our walk last summer. We followed a quiet road along the coast, with views across to Anglesey, meeting only a handful of locals out for a walk, cyclists and a few cars. It was a pleasant day, fairly clear and bright, with a bit of a breeze – a gloves-on/gloves-off sort of day! It was cloudier inland so we didn’t get the views of Snowdonia. We passed this lonely church (St Baglan’s) in a field, some way off from the village. Apparently, it’s quite an interesting unrestored medieval church so it might be one to return to for a visit some day.

WCP St Baglans church

St Baglan’s Church

As we turned the corner we had a view in front of us of a sandy spit of land, where the airport is. It almost looked as if the sandbars met across to Anglesey. We headed slightly inland to get round the bay and across a small river, through some pleasant villages. It is good to see that a lot of work is being done on the houses and many have been renovated. They don’t all look like holiday homes either!

We had a short stretch along a grassy footpath, a bit muddy in places. I think this was pretty much the only non-tarmac stretch we did today. This led to a footbridge and a causeway alongside the salt marsh of Foryd Bay where we saw a couple of little egrets. There had been a grebe on the Menai strait earlier. It seems to be quite a good place for birdwatching.

WCP salt marsh

Foryd Bay

A long, straight road led past the airport – surprisingly busy and noisy. We had seen an occasional light aircraft earlier in the day, but as we got nearer we could see planes and helicopters much more frequently.

WCP airport

Helicopter landing at Caernarfon airport

We stopped for lunch at Morfa Dinlle, with a new view of the hills of the Llŷn and the last views of Anglesey, with St. Dwynwen’s chapel standing out really clearly.

Caernarfon Bay

Caernarfon Bay

A straight path above the beach ran parallel with the road down to the small resort of Dinas Dinlle. The route didn’t take us up to the hillfort, but instead up to the main road. This was part that I hadn’t been looking forward to – a long, straight slog along the main road! However, it wasn’t too bad. For a start the road wasn’t continuously busy, and also there were significant stretches of the path that were separated from the road, even if only by a few metres, either running through villages, or following what must have been the old road. On the plus side, the bus back to Caernarfon ran hourly along this road so we had plenty of options for our stopping point. We did check the bus stops and keep an eye on the passing buses as the hotel had warned us that some bus services had been significantly reduced, although they thought this one was unaffected (it was!).

WCP Llyn

Llŷn sign

We passed through the village of Clynnog Fawr, with St Beuno’s church and the well just outside the village. Apparently, if you had a dip in the well, then slept overnight in the church on St Beuno’s tomb, you were cured. At least, you would say you were so you didn’t have to go through it all again! It is a very large church for such a small village, but was on the pilgrim route to Bardsey and is said to be where St Beuno is buried.

WCP Clynnog Fawr

St Beuno’s Church, Clynnog Fawr

We walked a little further, to the village of Gyrn Goch, where we decided to stop and wait for the bus. There looked to be few villages further along the road and we didn’t know where the next stop would be, plus we were just about ready to stop. It had been a much nicer day than expected, and I was glad that we had thought ahead to wear walking shoes rather than boots for a full day on tarmac.

WCP Caernarfon to Gyrn Goch


Wales Coast Path: Cemaes to Amlwch

WCP Cemaes to Amlwch-2

View to Porth Padrig

13th August 2017 – 14.5 miles

Today was a circular walk – we didn’t even think about buses on a Sunday! – so we decided to start and finish in Cemaes, being a rather prettier spot to return to then Amlwch (sorry, Amlwch).

We paid to stay in the car park down by the beach where we were given what is claimed to be ‘the biggest parking ticket in the world’ and noticed that Cemaes, like Moelfre yesterday, was having a Lifeboat Day. We didn’t detour into the village to see it, but we heard the drum group. We wondered if they were the group from Liverpool – they certainly looked and sounded very similar.

WCP Cemaes to Amlwch


The path skirted the bay, with views across to Wylfa Power Station as we gained height. We stopped for a break at Llanbadrig Point and realised we had not come very far and it might be slow going today! Soon after this we came upon Llanbadrig (St Patrick’s) Church, perched on the cliff top, which is meant to date from the 5th century.

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Llanbadrig church

The coastline from here was very rugged, on high cliffs with clear views across to the Skerries. There were also quite a few ups and downs over the headlands and into bays. The first major bay was Llanlleiana, with industrial remains and a chimney. I assumed this had something to do with the copper industry but it turns out to have been porcelain works.

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Llanlleiana porcelain works

We chatted a while to another walker who told us that the next headland was the most northerly point in Wales, so we continued there for our lunch. There is a small, rocky islet, Middle Mouse, which is a bit further north but this is the furthest north you can get without a boat! There were views across to the Isle of Man on the horizon. The headland had a strange structure which we thought was a WW2 lookout post but turns out to have been built to commemorate the coronation of Edward VII in 1902. I’m surprised it is in such a poor state of repair.

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The northernmost point of Wales

At this point, the battery in my camera gave up …

The bay at Porth Wen also had some impressive industrial archaeology, this time the remains of brick works. A few people had come to the bay on boats and were diving into the harbour.

After this, the path got easier and less rugged. A wide, level path through heather led to Bull Bay – we sat down for a drink in field of black bulls – or maybe they were cows, I didn’t look – and were very glad to see Amlwch in the near distance. I was very tired with feet like lead. Unfortunately, it didn’t seem to get much closer for a while and even when we were almost there, the coast path veered off hugging the coastline, for which, I suppose, we should be grateful!

We returned to Cemaes by the A-road to Bull Bay (that was quick and easy!), then the Coast Path to Porth Wen, and finally along a lane into Cemaes only to find that the chippy is shut on a Sunday – and I had so been looking forward to eating fish and chips looking out to sea. Never mind, we had fish and chips in the hotel restaurant before heading back home. The return journey had taken us half the time of the outward and felt a lot less tiring.WCP Cemaes to Amlwch


Wales Coast Path: Traeth Bychan to Amlwch

Dulas Bay12 August 2017 – 13.8 miles

We parked in a convenient lay-by on the main road near Traeth Bychan. The car park by the beach was a lot busier than yesterday (Saturday, with a much better forecast!) – lots of people with boats and jet-skis.

A short walk over the headland brought us to Moelfre and the familiar sight of the lifeboat station. We walked along the rocks until we realised that the path was higher up and avoided a pile of very seaweedy boulders.


Walking towards Moelfre

From a distance, we could see that there was a fair, which turned out to be Lifeboat Day, so we veered off in the direction of a cake stall. We sat in a quiet spot near the old lifeboat shed to enjoy our cakes before carrying on. It got quieter once past the village, but there were still a surprising number of people out on the path (especially compared with yesterday).

Moelfre Lifeboat Day

Moelfre Lifeboat Day

We passed the memorial to the Royal Charter, which was interesting, as it is such a familiar story from Liverpool local history, and the Anglesey place names are familiar too, so it was good to visit them at last.

Royal Charter memorial

Royal Charter memorial

There was a large beach at Lligwy with a car park – not as busy as expected given the number of people on the path so far, but it became very quiet after this – followed by a walk through sand hills.

A short walk over the headland then we headed inland through fields of sheep to skirt round Dulas Bay. The north side of Dulas Bay skirted salt marsh for a while, then we had to head inland, probably to avoid the Llys Dulas estate – lots of luxury holiday cottages by the look of it!

Dulas Bay

Dulas Bay

Back on the coast we spotted a group of half a dozen seals floating in the bay below us. We then headed over some rough ground – thistles and bracken and we took a slightly wrong path for a short while. It was rather nice to get a sudden view of Port Lynas lighthouse ahead of us.

Port Lynas

Looking toward Port Lynas

Amlwch still seemed a long way off and another walker said it would be about an hour and a half which was a bit dispiriting! We didn’t check how accurate he was though. We did not detour to see the headland and lighthouse at Port Lynas but carried on. The landscape changed as we turned to the north coast of Anglesey, with whiter rocks and heather.

Wales Coast Path Anglesey

Path through the heather

The coast became more rugged with cliffs and rocky outcrops. In one inlet we came across Fynnon Eilian (St Eilian’s Well). The actual site of the well didn’t have any water running through but there was a small waterfall slightly further up the inlet. Someone had placed a statue of St Francis there.

Ffynon Eilian

The site of Ffynon Eilian

Amlwch was now in sight. We walked round the harbour, part of which is now Copper Kingdom industrial heritage centre, and then round the back of a council estate.

Amlwch harbour

Amlwch harbour

We then headed towards the town centre, hoping there would still be buses running after 6 o’clock on a Saturday! They were, but we would have to wait an hour and a half for the next one. So Plan B went into operation and we got a cab back to the car!

WCP Traeth Bychan to Amlwch




Wales Coast Path: Mariandyrys to Traeth Bychan

11 August 2017 – 14.3 miles

WCP Mariandyrys to Traeth Bychan-13

View north of Benllech

We are staying back at Kingsbridge campsite near Beaumaris. We walked from there about two miles to where we had left the path about a year ago, near Mariandyrys. The forecast wasn’t good for today and it began to drizzle a bit as we left the road. At the bottom of some wooden steps were three young rabbits. Two scampered away and stayed still in the undergrowth (still visible) but the third stayed until we were very close, even after saying “shoo!” to him.

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Young rabbit

The path headed downhill to the beach at the eastern end of Red Wharf Bay. The tide was out and Robby decided to walk along the beach a short way, while I followed the waymarks onto the road.

WCP Mariandyrys to Traeth Bychan-8

Red Wharf Bay

After a break, we both walked along the beach, then saw there were inlets ahead of us and thought we ought to head inland. We noticed we were quite a way from the road with marsh and a wide inlet between us! We skirted round the inlet where it was shallow on the beach and made our way back to the path. The tide was a long way out and not due to come in for a while so we were in no danger – I’d like to think we are sensible enough that we wouldn’t have walked on the shore if the tide had been coming in –  but it made us think about keeping an eye on the route.

WCP Mariandyrys to Traeth Bychan-9

Coastal Environment Project plaque

It was amazingly quiet. We had seen one couple returning to the car park with a dog, but otherwise there was nobody out. The weather wasn’t bad at all – odd bits of drizzle, but you would expect to have seen someone! We did meet another dog walker near the car park where we had lunch. A very picturesque spot with a river inlet, an old boat, salt marsh with gulls, egrets and the obligatory heron.

WCP Mariandyrys to Traeth Bychan-10

Afon Nodwydd

We followed the path along the shore, past some very desirable cottages. The tide was now high, but there was only one part of the shore path where you had to tread carefully crossing a wet patch on rocks. We then came to the village of Red Wharf Bay – what a surprise after a lonely morning to find a bustling pub, restaurant, car park etc. Only a small place, but it looked lovely. We had an ice cream (and returned that evening for a very good dinner in the Ship Inn).

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Ice cream in Red Wharf Bay

We now passed a very large holiday site full of static caravans at St David’s Park. It was pretty well hidden away though. A bit further along the coast and we came to the resort of Benllech, that did look to be full of static caravans! The drizzle had turned to light rain here, which was as bad as it got all day – much better than forecast and I didn’t get my overtrousers out!

WCP Mariandyrys to Traeth Bychan

View back to Benllech

Benllech was as far as we had intended to come, but it was still early. We had a walk round to look for the bus stop and bus times, etc, then continued on our way. The walk was pleasant among trees and hedgerows with views up the coast. A few more caravan parks, but nothing too intrusive.

WCP Mariandyrys to Traeth Bychan-12


We finished our walk at Traeth Bychan, where a few people had boats and kayaks in the water. There is a good-sized pay and display car park here, toilets and a cafe (oh yes, and static caravans!). We walked up to the main road where we could see a bus stop – and a bus shot past! 30 seconds later and we’d have seen it coming! As the buses are every half hour, we walked a bit further on to catch one on the outskirts of Benllech. This took us to Menai Bridge where another bus took us past Beaumaris, a short walk back to our tent. WCP Mariandyrys to Traeth Bychan




Wales Coast Path: Bangor to Caernarfon

WCP Bangor to Caernarfon4th August 2017 – 11.8 miles

I’m not really sure why we haven’t done much of our longer walks in spring or early summer, but here we are again. The forecast looked better today than it has been for a while, and Friday is a better day than Saturday to drive into North Wales in August!

We found a parking place in a semi-residential area above the suspension bridge, then walked down to the bridge, only to find there were several convenient places we could have parked down there!

We soon came across a Botanic Garden. The path lead along the coast, through the trees, including this impressive Lucombe Oak.

WCP Bangor to Caernarfon-2

Lucombe Oak

It was a very pleasant walk, with glimpses of the Menai Strait and the Britannia Bridge, though it was obscured by trees preventing a good photograph. Just past the Britannia Bridge, we found this section which we later learned is a section of the old bridge which was damaged by fire in the 70s.

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Section of the old Britannia Bridge

The next section was through National Trust woodland in Glan Faenol, where we came across this impressive (and slightly spooky) mausoleum.

WCP Bangor to Caernarfon-5

Vaynol Mausoleum

Leaving the woods, we had lunch in a field with views across the Menai Strait to Plas Newydd on Anglesey.

WCP Bangor to Caernarfon-6

View to Plas Newydd

The route then took us inland along an A-road. There were few waymarks here so it was good to find some at the junction taking us onto a cycle path. We walked this section with a local lady. She told us how she had joined Slimming World and begun to walk every day. She has since lost 5 stone and stopped taking tablets for various medical conditions. She took a fork in the path to head down towards the coast and return to Bangor while we carried straight on. We later found we should have followed her, but we walked along the main road in Y Felinheli until we met up again with the path.

WCP Bangor to Caernarfon-8

Old station building

From here, the Wales Coast Path and the cycle path are part of the Lôn Las Menai which is easy to follow, although a few Coast Path waymarkers would be nice. It was pleasant and easy walking, although again trees prevented us from getting a clear view of the sea.

WCP Bangor to Caernarfon-9

Lôn Las Menai

We followed the path into Caernarfon and round to the far side of the castle.

WCP Bangor to Caernarfon-11


We crossed the river, so we can park there to begin the next leg of the walk, then took the bus back to Bangor, very close to where we had parked. WCP Bangor to Caernarfon


Wales Coast Path: Aberdaron to Penllech

wcp-aberdaron-penllech19 November 2016 – 15.4 miles

We stayed at a very nice B&B in the centre of the Llyn Peninsula. The owner was chatting to us and said they had a lot of walkers staying there, including another Ruth, who was also walking the Coast Path – yes, I follow her blog! ( He very kindly also followed us as we dropped off our car from the turn around point, then drove us down to Aberdaron, so we could do a linear walk. wcp-aberdaron-penllech-2

We had a quick look at the beach and bay at Aberdaron, then set of along the cliff paths. At the next bay we saw a man heading for a dip in the sea! Now, it was a pleasant day for November … but …! wcp-aberdaron-penllech-3

We headed west along the coast, with the bulk of Bardsey Island ahead of us. We climbed over the headland to reach the tip of the Llyn Peninsula, and you could see some of the buildings on the far side of the island. wcp-aberdaron-penllech-4

The coastline became more rugged, with cliffs and jagged rocks facing the Irish Sea. From the high point of the headland, you could see for miles around the coast, up towards Anglesey, south across Cardigan Bay, and inland to the snow-capped peaks in Snowdonia. There was a small coastguard lookout here and there had been an RAF station there during the War – some concrete foundations were visible around the area. wcp-aberdaron-penllech-7

We met a couple of groups of people by the headland. Later we met a runner and a couple of dog walkers, but otherwise it was fairly quiet. There were still a few people around when we reached the wide sandy beach at Porth Oer, families, well wrapped up and kids in wellies. Time was getting on and so we decided to play safe and take the waymarked path on top of the cliff, rather than walking along the beach and finding out why it was called Whistling Sands, just in case there wasn’t an obvious route off the beach at the far end (there was!). wcp-aberdaron-penllech-9

We were conscious of the time, and the light fading. I think this section had a lot of wishful thinking – that bay ahead of us is the one we are heading for! – but it wasn’t. The path was still pretty good, and we could see where we were going, but we knew this would not last for much longer, and so decided to head inland. wcp-aberdaron-penllech-10There were not many signposts, but we headed across a field that looked like a used path heading to a group of houses . At the far end there was a waymarker. We got to the house, walked the short distance across their back garden (sorry! – didn’t set off any alarms or anything!) and to a long farm track back to the road.

By this time, it was almost dark so it was quite a relief to just walk the last mile or two on quiet roads back to the car park. The route actually turned out to be a bit further than we’d anticipated (closer to 16 than 13 miles!) and maybe if we’d checked properly we would have walked a little faster in the morning. Another adventure!wcp-aberdaron-penllech




Wales Coast Path: Aberdaron to Rhiw

wcp-aberdaron-rhiw-420 November 2016 – 11.14 miles

We left our nice B&B, turning down the offer of a lift for a linear walk so that we had the option of lengthening or shortening the walk as we felt like it! We parked again at Aberdaron, heading slightly inland up a small river valley and through fields. wcp-aberdaron-rhiwWe did head down to a caravan site before realising it didn’t look right. Further back up the track there was a waymarker, more easily visible when you were going the ‘wrong’ way! wcp-aberdaron-rhiw-2

This took us back towards the coast, over rolling hills high above the sea. It was another beautiful day, sunny and clear, and fairly warm for November. We looked across Cardigan Bay, taking a bearing and decided that we actually could see Pembrokeshire on the horizon! There were a few sheep grazing and a number of ponies.wcp-aberdaron-rhiw-3

We headed inland up a lovely valley with a stream and waterfalls, and the remains of old mining industry.wcp-aberdaron-rhiw-5

The path then headed back to the coast on open access moorland, again high rolling hills. It appears that the path has been diverted and improved to run closer to the coast than it does on our map, although it has been pretty well waymarked. wcp-aberdaron-rhiw-6

We reached a minor road, close to the National Trust property of Plas-yn-Rhiw and at the western end of Hell’s Mouth Bay, and decided to make that our turnaround point. wcp-aberdaron-rhiw-7

We followed the quiet minor road back to Aberdaron, reaching it just as the sun was beginning to set. wcp-aberdaron-rhiw-8wcp-aberdaron-rhiw